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[UPDATED] Violent Incidents Involving Foreigners in Beijing

The rise in violent crime in Beijing is a hot topic in expat circles. To help cut through the rumors and hearsay, we'll be perpetually updating a list of attacks and arguments that have been verified as true. This is not intended to be a scare tactic. Rather, it's meant to keep you informed as to what's going on so that you know to be aware and alert when you're out at night.

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If you have any firsthand accounts that you think we should be aware of, please email bjguide@ringierasia.com and give us the details.

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Nov 21: We received a very troubling email about a sexual assualt carried out against a foreign woman in Sanlitun:

 

BEIJINGERS: (Posting this on behalf of victim, who wishes to remain anonymous, in warning) - Late Fri Nov 9th, a western woman was brutally sexually assaulted by a group of West African men in the Sanlitun area. These men are still at large. Beijing is no longer the safe city it once was.

 

We print this information only after verifying that it actually occurred as described. The person who verified the information is a long-time Beijing expat who is close friends with the victim. Our thoughts go out to the victim of this terrible crime.

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November 7: We received this email from a reader this week about a violent incident at a Sanlitun club which we can now reveal as Destination.

"I was not present to witness this happening but last night a man was
attacked inside a club in SanLiTun. When he noticed his bag had been
moved and saw a man riffling through the bag he checked for his phone
which was missing. He simply asked for the phone back and was attacked
by the men standing there. He was punched in the face and left with a
huge black eye. He was also punched in the jaw which has left him with
bruises and a swollen face. He ended up in the hospital possibly
needing stitches but not getting any. He also filed a report with the
police station but they did nothing and said they could do nothing.
While at the club there were security guards standing there watching
but did not assist him in any way."

This is the first time we have heard any reports of violence at Destination.

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November 2: After publishing the 10/18 incident (below), today we received an email from a reader stating:

re: 10/18 incident with the motorcycle, same thing happen to a
friend of mine right after the national holiday. Motorcycle pulled up beside her as she she was riding her bicycle and stole her iphone.  This happened near dongsishitiao.

Seems like they are targeting women on bikes near this area.

Bottom line, ladies should be extra careful about biking alone in this area at night.

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October 18, 2012: An American girl was assaulted while riding her bike between Gongti and Gulou. She sent us the following account, published in full with her permission:

"Thursday night, October 18th (technically Friday) around 12:30am I left a party at Elements by myself. After bicycling and turning from Gongrentiyuchang Xi Lu onto Gongrentiyuchang Bei Lu, I noticed a guy on a motorbike riding close to me—unusually close during a time of night when bicycle lanes are empty. No one else was in that lane but me on my push bike and this guy on his motorbike traveling side-by-side.

Before we reached Dongsishitiao bridge, this motor biker reached over me and brushed my waist and lap with his palm. Surprised I looked right and made eye-contact. This guy was anonymous in his black leather jacket, wearing a red backpack and white motorcycle helmet emblazoned with red and yellow flames. His helmet visor was up and I went through my mental rolodex trying to figure out who this dark-eyed person was. I could not determine if he was friend/stranger, male/female, local/foreign, young/old.

I bicycled faster and the motor biker followed me over Dongsishitiao Bridge and reached over again brushing my waist, trying to grab hold of me. I shouted and pushed him off me as we traveled west. Seeing a red traffic light ahead at Dongsishitiao and Dongzhimen Nan Xiao Jie intersection, I turned right. The motor biker followed, pulled up alongside of me and tried to grab me again. I warded him off before he could solidify his grip and lost him as we approached the edges of Gui Jie.

Was he trying to rob me? What were his intentions? I don’t know. I don’t look obviously foreign (I am of Chinese ethnicity). My memory of that night is clear (I did not leave Elements drunk, thank goodness). This incident is not unusual – my other female friends have shared similar experiences. Beijing is like other big cities and is not exempt from crime.

What particularly angers me is the helplessness that I and these women feel afterwards. The local authorities are unsympathetic. The last time I tried reporting a crime to the Sanlitun PSB, the policeman at the front desk told me to leave and refused to issue a robbery report because I could not 100% prove that my wallet was stolen within their district (I was pickpocketed somewhere between Tuanjiehu and Sanlitun).

When you’re out alone at night, the only person you can really depend on for safety is yourself. Everyone, please be careful at night. I was lucky that this motor biker either lost interest or was scared off by the bright lights of Gui Jie. Next time, I may not be so lucky."

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Oct 17, 2012: At 9:30pm a  City Weekend staffer was punched in the head twice by bouncers / security / thugs affiliated with the Yuese Bar (月色酒吧) which is on the strip of Sanlitun bars across from the Village. The dispute started when the staffer tried to park his bike by a tree in front of the bar. A Chinese man who refused to identify himself threatened his bike, then threatened the staffer then began shouting verbal abuse at the staffer, then struck the staffer in the head with fist. The staffer removed the bike to a different location and came back and took a photo of the assailant at which point another Chinese man came out of nowhere and struck the staffer in the head with fist and shouted derogatory statements about foreigners. Bottom line for foreigners, please do avoid that strip of bars, they are nothing but trouble. And in particular Yuese, which is clearly antagonistic to foreigners.

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July 14, 2012: On Saturday evening, a foreign woman was attacked by a man in a Sanlitun bar. According to Weibo user 乔什么乔, a female friend was harassed and knocked down, resulting in bruising and a swollen jaw. The alleged attacker (pictured below) was taken to the police station but refused to admit guilt or provide identifying information. After a few hours in custody he apologized, but still did not take responsibility for her injuries.


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July 11, 2012: At 3:20pm, an American tourist was stabbed and killed in a hutong near Dashilan. Police have not confirmed the motive for the attack, but the suspect they apprehended at the scene has a previous arrest record for several attempted robberies.

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June 29, 2012: At approximately midnight, near the east gate of Kangbao Gardens (just to the south of Sanlitun Soho), a foreign woman was on her bike waiting at a red light when she was sexually harassed and groped by a Chinese man. She managed to push him away and bike home, but when she stopped at her compound gate to open it he came up behind her and continued to grope her while trying to push her inside the compound. Building security guards were nearby, but did not offer any assistance. She shouted and fought him off, pushing him far enough away that she could get inside the gate and close it behind her. The man ran away without building security pursuing him. She explains (in the comments below): "My incident might not be foreign-related or xenophobic in nature; nonetheless, for Chinese and foreigners alike it could be worth knowing that these things happen in order for all of us to be more cautious. As many of you I have always felt that Beijing is extremely safe, and all though it might not be as bad as other places in the world perhaps we have all gotten a little bit too comfy and naïve."

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June 13, 2012: Around 2am outside of Zhuang bar in Shuangjing, a French man tried to explain to two Chinese men that a taxi had been waiting for him when they tried to get inside. These men phoned another friend of theirs who was nearby, and they proceeded to violently push both the French man and two Australian men who came from the bar to try to help translate. One of the Australian men was punched in the face unprovoked and then kicked repeatedly in the torso after falling to the ground. The staff at Zhuang locked their doors and refused to provide assistance to the injured man. The other two foreign men were repeatedly pushed and threatened every time they tried to approach the bar area to help the man who had been punched. The injured man was later hit with a stool by one of the same Chinese men when he tried to find help, and the French man was punched hard enough in the side that he was coughing up blood the next day. The Chinese men eventually got into a car near Grinders and drove away. The injured Australian was helped by the staff of the convenience store along that strip, who provided him with an ice pack and tissues. He suffered a badly cut lip. Afterwards, they filed a police statement and contacted their embassies. According to one of the men involved (who is a dual citizen), the Australian embassy provided no assistance beyond telling him to file a police report, while the British embassy took a detailed report of everything that happened. The reason he provided all these details is because he hopes that people will take care to try to avoid arguments (even if they feel they are 100% in the right). In his opinion, communication barriers and the current tensions make situations more difficult to diffuse, so it's best to avoid them if at all possible. He also made a point of saying that he hopes reports of these incidents will serve to make people more aware of their surroundings but not resentful towards Chinese people. Despite his experience, he stressed that (as with anywhere else in the world) most locals are genuinely good people and we shouldn't let these accounts cloud our judgement.

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June 12, 2012: The U.S. Embassy sent out a warning email after one of their employees was assaulted at Element nightclub, on the west side of the Workers' Stadium. Elements responded with a press release claiming their staff acted appropriately to diffuse the situation. The full text of the email and subsequent press release can be found here, along with information about the embassy's emergency services for citizens.

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May 23, 2012: City Weekend staffer Sarah Ting-Ting Hou was verbally and then physically assaulted by two Chinese men in a car while walking home along the street by Nearby the Tree in Sanlitun back street. Her attackers then parked the car on Xindong Lu and waited for her to walk past before punching and kicking both her and the other expat couple who was walking her home.

 


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Comments

Comments

manneken_pis's picture

manneken_pis

Just wanted to pop in here to say that here at Brussels we do take our customers' safety seriously. It's awful that incidents like this are happening more frequently - we all used to feel impossibly safe in Beijing! I wish we could do something to help the victims - but the best we can do is to help prevent things like this from happening. If you're ever leaving our bar alone and feel unsafe - we will be happy to escort you out of the complex to gongti north street. Be safe!
siennapc's picture

siennapc

I feel like the Beijing police would be a thousand times more willing to go after African guys than Chinese guys, so hopefully there's some kind of resolution in this latest assault. But awful that it happened and that the only reason I can be hopeful about anything is my faith that the Sanlitun police are racist.

tranquilitybay

come to Shanghai, much better city. Safer too

scott_grow

Thank you, Sigrid! :)
sigrid_ekman's picture

sigrid_ekman

I like Scott.

monkey88

Does anyone know what bar this happened in?
positivelynatalie's picture

positivelynatalie

The Weibo didn't say whether the attacker was foreign or Chinese, just that the attack happened and that the image provided was of the alleged attacker. And I think that honestly that street by the police station should just be avoided whenever possible, it's one of the only places in Beijing I find to be shady even in daylight.

dougquaid79

Mr sesame street doesn't even look Chinese, he looks like a uygur, but I doubt they'd sport that t-shirt. City weekend, could you start a section about foreigner on foreigner crime?And how many times my girl and I are harassed by those Africans in heaven supermarket and in front of the cop station along that street, to buy their "stuff", how they grab my girls arm in front of me, trying to provoke me? Tell you the truth, i'm more on the look out when I see them than the Chinese guys.
tominsh's picture

tominsh

@dougquaid79: yawn, NEXT!

scott_grow

Hahahaha. phillipvasels, you amuse me. You think I'm too violent because I say that I make an effort protect people? You greatly misunderstand me, sir, and the warrior spirit on the whole. I avoid violence at all costs when able, but am more than willing to get violent if necessary. I am reminded of a line from the HBO series, Generation Kill. At the end, when the invasion is over and the Marines are getting ready to fly back stateside, they are gathered around discussing whether killing in war is ok or not. The final words on the matter come from Sergeant Brad Colbert: "The fact of the matter is, those who can't kill will always be subject to those who can." Again, I avoid violence whenever possible, but if necessary, I am willing to be violent in order to protect people. I think one day, it is possible that it will be you, phillipvasels, whom I will use violence to protect. We'll see how you feel about my "high noon on Mainstreet" violence then.

dougquaid79

To my fellow expats: Party's over guys. Those days when we could prance around drunk and molest any women we wanted, without fear of the little chinamen - who were too afraid of our big western bodies - is sadly coming to an end. as they grow richer and we flee our crumbling economies back home and flood into china looking for handouts, our desparation is becoming all too obvious to the chinese. Our breed, the exotic westerner, who once were worshipped in japan, south korea and taiwan but are now hated, is replaying itself in the middle kingdom. We must search for the next poor, asian country with easy girls, to "kill time" in, to avoid going back home where we'd be working at starbucks and barely getting laid. Vietnam sounds good! Oh wait forgot about 1954-1975, damnit!

phillipvasels

I'm out of this one. You guys are way too violent for me and this isn't High Noon on Mainstreet either.
tominsh's picture

tominsh

What's just? And what its opposite? If we start quibbling about moral systems then we won't add anything new to this board. What counts is that each person has the right to be safe in this unsafe world, and I firmly believe you should take your personal precautions because neither Ceasar nor God can help you when s*** hits the fan. I personally believe the will to exercise self-defense and self-preservation are two inalienable feature of all animals, and as enlightened animals we must learn control these instincts and, sometimes, ease them with a carefully use of technology. That's all.

scott_grow

Give some examples of the injustices I walk by and do nothing about every day.

phillipvasels

All this saber rattling. You both walk right by injustice every single day and do nothing and keep walking. Of this, I am sure.

scott_grow

tominsh, I agree with you, the world sucks. The physically strong but morally weak will oppress the physically weak. For me, though I may not always be as physically strong as is necessary, I strive to do what's right when I have the opportunity. Granted there have been times where I let fear hold me back, but I hate myself for it and I've vowed never to let it happen again.

scott_grow

That's fine if its culturally permissible. But what if it was your girlfriend who was being beaten by a stranger. What if it was your 4 year old daughter who was run over in the street. Just because its acceptable doesn't mean it shouldn't be condemned. I'm not gonna relax on it, when I see such behavior, I chastise the people who do nothing. Every Chinese person I've talked to about issues like this all say that yes, its fucked up and its wrong. But they resign themselves to the fact that you can't change the minds of 1.3 billion people over night. And I totally agree, but that doesn't mean we shouldn't try every chance we get. Even if I only affect one person out of a million, maybe that person can affect someone else and so on and so on. I'm a warrior, I stand up for what I believe in no matter what. Even if it means it might get me killed. I won't sacrifice my honor by not doing what is right just so I can live a little while longer. Just saying.
tominsh's picture

tominsh

IMHO there's no problem with the culture of this or that country... the world's horrible place, period. You can only prepare for the worst and be ready to use any means to protect your neck. Be a samurai, even if it takes buying and carrying some lethal tech. Maybe I'm wrong, but this is just my point of view.

phillipvasels

Scot, man you got to relax. You're just working yourself into a real lather. Haven't you lived long enough to realize that people don't always behave in the ways that you want them to and that doesn't necessarily mean they are wrong either. Don't misunderstand me, I agree with your pov. But in a country where 20 people watch a baby being run over TWICE and then walk on, what your asking for is no a brainer, isn't it? This culture teaches you not to get involved in other people's disputes especially relationships and marriages. So, a security guard sees something that looks like a bf or husband having his way with a girl might be perceived to be just that and the guard looks on with amusement. In a country where men routinely hit women and they all hit kids then a guard's do nothing reaction is culturally permissible here.
tominsh's picture

tominsh

LOL Scott. Misanthropy at its finest.

scott_grow

Yeah, its too much to expect for a human being to do the right thing. I don't get paid to stop someone from potentially being raped or murdered when I witness something going down, so it makes sense for me to turn a blind eye. Doesn't matter if that's someone's son or daughter or husband or wife or whatever. There's too damn many people in the world anyway. In fact, what I SHOULD do is kill all of them, the perpetrators AND the victim. All the fewer people in the world, less mouths to feed. I'd be doing humanity a favor.

phillipvasels

Yeah, I think it is too much to expect.

scott_grow

No one's asking them to take a bullet for us, just stand up and say something when they witness a woman being accosted. For 3000 a month, is that really too much to ask, considering that it probably doesn't happen all that often?

phillipvasels

Building security are only fixtures like lamp posts. To rely on them is to your own peril. They only exist to increase building profit through monthly assessment fees by building management and to fulfill required employment quotas. They are not going to 'take a bullet' for you for 3000 a month. Get some mace.

scott_grow

@tominsh - That is a terrific idea! I bet if word on the street was that tasers were commonplace amongst the many things in a woman's purse in China, dudes would definitely think twice about playing grab-ass. Haha.
tominsh's picture

tominsh

When in doubt, buy a taser.

scott_grow

I have to agree with postivelynatalie. All too often the people whose responsibility it is to ensure security are asleep on the job or just plain ignoring their duties. If the people in charge aren't aware of a problem with their security staff, then they have no way to fix the problem, ie reprimanding and/or firing their asses.
positivelynatalie's picture

positivelynatalie

@sigrid_ekman - I would still recommend at least trying to report this to your embassy. It may not seem helpful, but it could prove important in the long run as they compile their statistics. Another thing to do in your situation would be to report the in
sigrid_ekman's picture

sigrid_ekman

Time/date: Friday evening, around midnight Location: Huayuanzixing compound (right next to Kangbao gardens east gate/ south of Sanlitun SOHO) I was returning home from Face bar on my bike when a man (also on a bike) stopped next to me at a red light. He sexually harassed me by grouping me. I responded by pushing him off me and biking away and thought of it as nothing more than him just another creep. When I get to my building it takes me some time to open the gate with my key card. As soon as I open the building door the man is behind me trying to push me in side while grouping me between my legs. I react aggressively (on autopilot), fighting back and start shouting at him. The man gets startled by my reaction and I manage to get inside the building and close the door and the man runs off. All this happens as the building security guard is sitting a stone throw away not doing anything to assist me. I have not reported this to my embassy (I don’t think they have an official system to take in these types of issues), but I know a "security newsletter" circulates regularly around the embassies. If anyone knows who publishes these and how to contact them perhaps it would be a good idea to make that information available to everyone here so that these incidents can be included. My incident might not be foreign-related or xenophobic in nature; nonetheless, for Chinese and foreigners alike it could be worth knowing that these things happen in order for all of us to be more cautious. As many of you I have always felt that Beijing is extremely safe, and all though it might not be as bad as other places in the world perhaps we have all gotten a little bit too comfy and naïve. It is after all a huge city and there is bound to be some creeps/psychos/aggressive people out there given the share number of people living here.

scott_grow

@positivelynatalie & @rebelrebel - I too agree with learning the language, but not everyone can do it. Some people just don't have the same skill for learning language that others do. If they try and can't get it down, it isn't their fault. Now for those
positivelynatalie's picture

positivelynatalie

@rebelrebel - I think you make a fair point about people learning the language and ditching an entitled attitude. In terms of whether or not this is "alarmism," I don't think it is. The three incidents mentioned here are ones that have been confirmed, but

rebelrebel

"The rise in violent crime in Beijing is a hot topic in expat circles. " For one, I wouldn't call three incidents in the span of two months a "rise" in violent crime, especially considering that one out of the three ( the one at Element) was more than likely some jackass acting out of line, thought the US Embassy characterized it as an unprovoked attack. I used to work on Sixth Street in Austin, TX while I was in college and we would see at least three fights a night, stabbings, some wannabe rappers shooting up a club, armed robberies, etc. All of this in a city that's one-nineteenth the size of Beijing, if that. And on Sixth Street there is a veritable ARMY of police officers in riot gear, whereas only a small contingent of Beijing police is needed to keep the peace on Bar Street. So City Weekend why don't you aim for more credibility with your articles and less alarmism. All in all Beijing is pretty safe, so stop feeding people's hysteria with this crap. That's like putting out an article that says "the rise in rapes of Chinese women by British expats has been on the rise" after that story came out about the drunken chav who got his dick knocked in the dirt. The first and the third were pretty bad incidents, but I think we should heed the moderate words of the Australian man in the first incident, "In his opinion, communication barriers and the current tensions make situations more difficult to diffuse, so it's best to avoid them if at all possible. He also made a point of saying that he hopes reports of these incidents will serve to make people more aware of their surroundings but not resentful towards Chinese people. Despite his experience, he stressed that (as with anywhere else in the world) most locals are genuinely good people and we shouldn't let these accounts cloud our judgement." He sounds like a decent, understanding guy unlike most of the whiny crybaby expats who have taken to feeling so persecuted since they voluntarily decided to move to China. I know many of you guys are white and aren't used to being marginalized in your own countries, where you are the beneficiaries of racism rather than the objects of it. But when you up and move to a country where you constitute a minority, you should expect to be treated like a minority. Speaking as an American, it's a shame to say that my fellow countrymen tend to carry around this sense of entitlement with them wherever they go and it nauseating. Which brings me to my other point, which is: learn the damn language. At least try. It's not as hard as you think. You can't come to China and expect everyone to accommodate you by speaking English. If people knew more words than cao ni ma and lai yi ge pijiu, they might not have such problems. Final point: Don't go to Bar Street. It's full of trash both Chinese and foreign. It's just a bunch of skeezy boozed up frat boy types oozing with testosterone and their rough, Chinese equivalents. Recipe for disaster.

scott_grow

The job of the police is to take a report, not stop criminals. By the time the police get there, chances are, the majority will be finished and the major damage will be done. The police will ask what happened, they may or may not take notes, and they probably won't follow up. I saw a fight once in wudaokou between a group of koreans and a group of chinese. I think it was like four on five or something like that, but the police were there and they did nothing. They watched just like everyone else. Of course, in that case, I watched too because it was more like a fair fight so I stayed out of it. not the point. The point is, the police here aren't going to do much unless its a foreigner beating up a Chinese.
dosada's picture

dosada

Why this topic attracts so much attention? I really don't understand! Can you imagine how many fights and incidents occurs in Beijing and not involve foreigners? If there would be a Chinese guy or Chinese girl in these situations, he or she also would have some problems - that's for sure. Recently at Shuangjing I've seen a fight between Chinese guys. It lasted for one minute, but it was still unpleasant. And that's a usual stuff, it happens everywhere - in any city of any country. Alcohol, frustration, any other reasons - but it happens. And your nationality doesn't matters. It's not interethnic group conflict. It's just a domestic crime. And I would recommend not to interfere in these conflicts even you have a good medical insurance and martial arts knowledge - just call a police. They react very quickly and can come in few minutes. Be reasonable, respectful and alerted specially when going out by night in such a criminogenic areas like San Li Tun. Use these rules and you will not get into trouble not in China, nor in any other country...

scott_grow

Very well, gentlemen. Or ladies, or both, whatever the case may be. The profile pictures aren't very gender specific, so please forgive my generalities. Anyway, I suppose I should be more specific. I believe in the escalation of force, which is defined as "the amount of force necessary to prevent serious bodily harm or death to yourself or innocent bystanders." That having been said, I in no way advocate 'twenty or thirty cowards' ganging up on the three or more guys kicking one guy's ass any more than I advocate three or more guys kicking one guy's ass. You are both absolutely right, the spectators should only try to break up the fight, not escalate the violence. Although I must admit from personal experience, once you try to play the hero and save one guy from ICU, you do run the risk of turning it into three or more guys kicking TWO guys' asses, in which case it may be necessary for the escalation of force, but I stand by my statement that this is a far better case than standing by while you watch one man potentially getting murdered. Just sayin.

phillipvasels

This is just the beginning of something that has been brewing for a long time and now the pot is starting to boil over. I quite understand scott_grow's point but its positive point will be very short lived as it will increase the size of the mob next time especially if those "twenty to thirty cowards' he mentioned jumped into the fray. Can you image the news coverage on that? Headline: "A foreign mob massacres a few Chinese guys out for a beer together to watch a football game" Then they will throw us all out. The police have no interest in protecting us and neither do the courts. We can expect that the film division of the army and the ChangChun film studios will churn out more tv movies about the heroics of the Boxers. Right now they still need foreign actors to play despicable characters in these productions. What if we said no to those roles? Stay tuned.
positivelynatalie's picture

positivelynatalie

@scott_grow: I can definitely see your point. I think "avoid conflict" in this sense means just let some guy take your cab and look for another one. Obviously, it's a different situation entirely when you see someone being hurt. Although, I would still re

scott_grow

I just wanted to say something. Avoid conflict, yes. But sometimes, and I know from experience, it cannot be avoided. If you witness more than one dude beating the crap out of a single person, grow some balls and do something about it instead of whipping out your iphone and filming it and saying, "Dude, someone should do something. Some should stop this. Please, someone stop this." Why can't YOU stop it. I don't know who is worse, the drunken Chinese mob that is beating a single person, or the twenty to thirty cowards standing by watching, waiting for "someone" to do something.

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